FREE DOWNLOAD ✓ Stalin By Ian Grey

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E all a messianic determination to lead Russia to a grand destiny Grey's comprehensive biography portrays Stalin as a complex paradoxical figure a leader whose power was rooted in the tsarist traditions he abhorred and whose tyranny was based on an ambition to ensure the strength of his party In his single minded dedication to the growth of Russia under communism St. Imagine reading a biography of Hitler that focused mainly on his love of his adopted Germany his oratory skills and his fondness for dogs You d come away with a nagging sense that story was somehow incomplete Hadn t you read somewhere that Hitler started a brouhaha which inconvenienced several people Wasn t Hitler in addition to being a gifted public speaker one of the worst mass murderers in history Ian Grey s book on Stalin feels like that imaginary overly selective Hitler bioGrey clearly admires Stalin whom he describes as a super patriot for his adopted Russia a tireless leader who singlehandedly micromanaged the USSR into becoming an industrial and military superpower that defeated Hitler saving Europe from German domination This Stalin sounds impressive Ian Anything else we should know about him Well Stalin was also modest treasured economy of words shunned luxury stayed up late like Hitler and had an impish sense of humour to match his impish stature Many Russians wept when he died in 1953 because he had made them proud of their country The great man had a remarkable ability to avoid remorse by staying laser focused on being the only guy in any room who knew what had to be done and was willing to do itDid this super leader have any flaws at all Grey admits that in his later years Stalin became a little paranoid seeing enemies everywhere At five foot six with a withered left arm Stalin may have had a touch of the Napoleon complex Stalin worked so darn hard making every decision in the USSR for decades that his first wife killed herself His kids were estranged from him His son was an alcoholic wastrel while daughter Svetlana kept disappointing her dad by getting involved with Jewish men Unlike Hitler Stalin was no speechmaker but both were micromanagers who overruled their trained military men and had zero grasp of economics Although Stalin killed even innocent people than Hitler the word genocide doesn t appear in Grey s book Like Stalin Grey has an impressive ability to compartmentalize topicsTake mass murder To make an omelette Grey tacitly suggests Stalin had to break a few million eggs He knew he had to drive Russians to sacrifice to meet his goals so what s a little deliberate mass starvation torture and constant political executionsIn a thoughtful introduction Grey points out that Russia has no history of democracy and has always been ruled by dictators He suggests that Russia s vast hard to defend geography makes autocracy a natural response to the exigencies of Russian national defenceOK but what about Stalin s ruthless implementation of Lenin s Communism which not only enslaved and killed tens of millions of people in the USSR but ruined the lives of millions of other people in Stalin s satellite state buffer zone in Eastern Europe and is still a cancer in China Viet Nam North Korea and Cuba among others Not really a focus for Grey Stalin wanted no repeat of the WWII slaughter Russians endured with over 15 million Russians killed He sought a buffer between Russia and the capitalist Western Europe especially Germany who he feared would invade the USSR again given the chance Stalin had the power to enslave Eastern Europe to create that buffer so he did The omelette analogy fits again Sure thanks to Communism a huge part of humanity has been deprived of political freedom and lives in fear misery and poverty but what you gonna do To read about what Communism actually did to people you need to read Satter s It was a long time ago and it never happened anyway or Solzhenitsyn s The Gulag ArchipelagoGrey s breathtaking selectiveness and failure to offer any moral or economic context for Stalin s monstrous actions might have been tolerable if he were a better writer Instead he annoyingly calls Stalin by an earlier nickname Koba for a chapter and spells Tehran two different ways Grey is not really a detail guy often throwing around numbers for things like industrial output without explaining their time frame or why they matter Grey never asks himself what life was like for the average Russian under Stalin She worked in The People s Glorious Tractor Factory 257 and was bludgeoned into ever higher output targets with no ability to share of the fruits of her own labours no freedom to criticize his government and no consumer goods other than vodka to dull the pain of missing family members killed by Uncle Joe

FREE DOWNLOAD Stalin By Ian Grey

Stalin By Ian Grey

Alin was able to disregard all sense of morality Yet through his magnetism he commanded the respect of his colleagues and the adulation of his people Even Winston Churchill held him in awe Stalin is a powerful history of Russia's evolution from backward nation to world power as well as a dramatic portrait of a man who was called both The Implacable and Beloved Fathe. A worthwhile read You don t understand the 20th century if you don t understand Stalin He is usually portrayed sympathetically almost as a victim of the West s duplicity and paranoia abouthis designs for the world Without Joe there would be no Soviet Union and despite the fact that he was directly or indirectly responsible for human deaths than anyone in history he is still highly revered as the Father of The USSR His force of will and unfailing vision regarding the viability of communism carried Russia from a third rate nation to a world power A remarkable man by any standard and not all evil if this record is correct His fingerprints are still all over our world today especially when one considers that Mao modeleded his own governance on his hero and mentor Joseph Stalin If we are to trust the author s take on post WW 2 reconstruction the leaders of the West drove JS to his extreme positions on European reconstruction by shifting from seeing him as an untrusted ally to the source of all evil We started the arms race He just had to keep up At one point the author uotes Western leaders as saying the use of the two Atom bombs on Japan was not necessary to defeat them but was done to scare Stalin and keep him in check He was shook by the presence of these weapons and immediately ordered his top scientists to learn how to make onefast The infamous and intriguing Russian espionage tales that marked the early Cold War era revealed how Western secrets were passed to Russian agents for bomb implementation plans The US followed with an even mightier Hydrogen Bomb which was replaced later by ballistic missiles Thus the Arms Race began A very interesting read despite the mountains of Russian names that made reading difficult much of the time

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Joseph Stalin was one of the most frightening figures of the twentieth century His name brings to mind brutal terrorism and ruthless oppression Yet as New York Times bestselling author Ian Grey shows at the core of the Man of Steel was a humble puritanical Georgian peasant What set him above others was his intelligence discipline perception indomitable will and abov. Ian Grey s book is invaluable for its factual and objective thoroughness of one of history s most compelling subjects Joseph Stalin Many Western historians have branded this important figure as a cold and hollow character even sadistic and antisocial Grey brilliantly sweeps these blatantly biased remarks aside with thorough historiographical commentary throughout the text Grey also achieves a remarkable understanding of the Soviet perspective during the Stalin era by dispelling Western conceived notions of humanism that many historians forcibly consign on Russian history One only need to read the preface for his perspective on how one should approach such a controversial figure Here is a selection from the preface where Grey briefly comments on the origins of anti Stalin historiesThe distorted portrayal of Stalin has been in part the work of Trotsky and those who sympathize with him Other factors have contributed also such as the idolatry of Lenin the bitterness of migr social democrats and the moral judgments of Western historians Khrushchev s speech to the Twentieth Party Congress in 1956 and the partial rejection of Stalin by the party and the Soviet government as well as the confused de Stalinization policy have added to the obfuscation Grey xiWhile maintaining an academic objectivity Grey also remains critical of Stalin Again though his criticism stems from a knowledge of Stalin as not a cruel man he did not derive pleasure from inflicting suffering upon others xiv Whereas hack writers such as Robert Conuest love to rumor about Stalin the sadist One of his overarching theories of the Russian brand authoritarian leadership is that it follows coherently through Russia s early history of strong authorities notably Ivan the Dread and Peter the Great Instead of Russia s Third Rome of Orthodox Christianity and the veneration of Tsardom Grey argues that this was replaced in the USSR by the messianic theory of Marxism and the public veneration of Lenin and of Stalin While I do not agree with this this psycho historical theory is interesting from an academic perspectiveGrey is certainly not a Marxist which he finds the dogma totally unacceptable and abhorrent But in his analysis he has tried to understand and portray Stalin in his own Russian context xviOverall I consider this a must read if one really wants to know a accurate portrayal of Stalin and his importance in history


10 thoughts on “Stalin By Ian Grey

  1. says:

    Ian Grey's book is invaluable for its factual and objective thoroughness of one of history's most compelling subjects Joseph Stalin Many Western historians have branded this important figure as a cold and hollow character even sadistic and antisocial Grey brilliantly sweeps these blatantly biased remarks aside with thorough historiographical commentary throughout the text Grey also achieves a remarkable understanding of the Sovi

  2. says:

    This book is a long and well written biography of Joseph Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili a Georgian born on December 18 1878 known in history as Joseph Stalin who died in Moscow on March 5 1953Is the result of an extensive and

  3. says:

    This book provides descriptions in great detail about the life and times of Stalin Exceptional information about his philosophies thought process mannerisms wartime decision making A wonderful in depth and factual presentation about the life and times of this great Russian patriot and leader

  4. says:

    This is an incredibly researched beautifully written and unbiased account of one of the most important figures in the 20th century Grey is not a communist and in the preface he made clear his disdain of Marxism but Grey sets aside his own opinions and gives an excellent account of the Russian historical perspective Stalin is a complex figure and Grey gives us a cut and dry account abundant with facts laying out Stalin's achievements polici

  5. says:

    An even handed treatment of a man of his timeStalin was undoubtedly the man made for the emergence of Soviet Union and he was uniuely suited for the war effort The West has vilified this guy out of paranoia and imperial ambition Ian Grey presented a unvarnished account of the man Stalin Bravo

  6. says:

    Imagine reading a biography of Hitler that focused mainly on his love of his adopted Germany his oratory skills and his fondness for dogs You'd come away with a nagging sense that story was somehow incomplete Hadn't you read somewhere that Hitler started a brouhaha which inconvenienced several people? Wasn't Hitler in addition to b

  7. says:

    A worthwhile read You don’t understand the 20th century if you don’t understand Stalin He is usually portrayed

  8. says:

    I haven't read that much about Russia so the book was informative I believe that it was accurate after having read other reviews I didn't know that at the end of Lenin's life he was not enad with Stalin I am going nuts over the use 0f He Himself again I don't understand the use of that Of course if it is he it has got to be himsel

  9. says:

    Well written I found myself surprised that there was so little mention of the United States When the US entered WWII there was no men

  10. says:

    This is a very interesting book It covers the beginnings of communism in Soviet Russia through to the death of Stalin The first half is really

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