Two Hours Free read ¶ 109


  • Hardcover
  • 256
  • Two Hours
  • Ed Caesar
  • English
  • 08 September 2017
  • 9781451685848

10 thoughts on “Two Hours

  1. says:

    We are hardwired to discover new ways to challenge ourselves To run a 26 miles and 365 yards of a marathon in un

  2. says:

    It's good journalism and storytelling Being perfectly honest I don't know how much interest this book will hold for non runners but I found i

  3. says:

    “Mutai is a Kenyan a Kalenjin and a Kipsigis He was born in the village of Euator which sits at nearly 9000 feet in the lush highlands at the western escarpment of the Rift Valley and as its name suggests at the belt line of the world He is a husband a father a son a grandson a nephew a cousin a coach a businessman and a potentate He is a rich man who grew up without shoes”A retelling of the marathon from

  4. says:

    While not exactly what I'd expected Ed Caesar has done a remarkable job of cohesively stringing together information that he's gathered over much time spent with elite Kenyan primarily there is also some exposure to Ethiopian elites as well run

  5. says:

    The fly on the wall insider account is a hallmark of sports literature and when the subjects are open and engaging and on field happen

  6. says:

    I read this on recommendation of my marathon man husband I really enjoyed it because it does not only speak to run

  7. says:

    This came out a year prior to the announcement of Nike's Breaking2 project which I found funny as Adidas is mentioned consistently throughout the book Some interesting stuff about training but ultimately just jumps around too much and could have been cut down

  8. says:

    For all the nerdy runners out there this book is for you For all the non nerdy runners out there I do not think you’d like this bo

  9. says:

    A history of the marathon that lobs in a few insights about running Aside from that I suspect the book was hashed out as PR for a shoe manufacturer; Caesar seems keen to cast doubt on Chris McDougall's barefoot running theory and it neatly precedes Nikes two hour marathon project

  10. says:

    This was a heck of a book The history of distance races was new to me as was much of the day to day life of people in the high altitude towns of Kenya from which so many fast distance runners originate Geoffrey Mutai is a great centerpiece for this book analyzing marathons from several angles It was such a shame to read the chapter about performance enhancing drugs and their effects upon distance running Baseball and weightliftin

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Ed Caesar À 9 Free read

Two Hours

Just published to extraordinary acclaim in Britain as “ Hoop Dreams for runners” The Spectator and “a celebration of the human spirit” The Observer Two Hours is the first book from a blazing new talent who “has established himself as perhaps the best new long form magazine writer since the arrival of John Jeremiah Sullivan” The Guardian and whose “reportage has the wonderfully old fashioned feel of the very best of American journalism” The Sunday Times Two hours to cover twenty six miles and yards It is running’s Everest a feat once. We are hardwired to discover new ways to challenge ourselves To run a 26 miles and 365 yards of a marathon in under two hours it would be necessary to run at an average pace of 4 hours 34 seconds per mile This book sets out to explore the likelihood of this happening and if it were to happen what the key levers would be that would enable this achievement OK so maybe it s one for running aficionados But lots of people do run not to anything remotely close to the standard reuired to approach this level of performance but sufficient to be able to fully appreciate what a crazy pinnacle this really is To put it into some context the average finish time for over 38000 runners in the 2014 London Marathon was around four and a half hours A decent goal for a good high school runner would be to run a single mile in under 5 minutesThe author delves into the history of the race and digs up some interesting facts about its origin and its growth into a mass participation event It seems that just about every large city has its own marathon these days and having run in London Berlin and Paris amongst others I certainly appreciate the appeal of these events It s an opportunity to participate albeit distantly in the same event as world class athletes At the same time it s a chance to challenge yourself and often to raise money for a worthy causeBut the main focus here is on the elite athletes as they chip away at the world record time and get ever closer to the two hour mark The current world record is 20257 Not so far off then Well maybe not but some experts still suggest it is physiologically impossible for humans to achieve this goal In this book the author takes a different stance and feels that the achievement is inevitable eventually The physiological mental environmental and training impediments are closely examined often using outputs from serious scientific study I found it all totally fascinating So that s the history and the science but the secondary element to this book and the one that really grabbed me and hauled me through it in two sessions is the account of top Kenyan runner Geoffrey Mutai Geoffrey comes from the Rift Valley area of Kenya and in fact originates from a tribe that produces most of the best marathon runners in the world Like just about everyone he grew up with he didn t wear a pair of shoes until his teenage years and his childhood and early adolescence were memorable mainly because of its general impoverishment and the sheer effort reuired just to get by day to day His story is interspersed with the scientific study and it works really well It elevates what might have been considered a pretty dry academic text into something with much depth and feelingI know this won t be everyone s cup of tea but I d urge anyone interested in marathon running or even sport in general to take a look at it I found it inspiring

Download ´ E-book, or Kindle E-pub À Ed Caesar

Seen as impossible for the human body But now we can glimpse the mountaintop The sub two hour marathon will reuire an exceptional combination of speed mental strength and endurance The pioneer will have to endure live braver plan better and be luckier than anyone who has run before So who will it beIn this spellbinding book journalist Ed Caesar takes us into the world of elite marathoners some of the greatest runners on earth Through the stories of these rich characters like Kenyan Geoffrey Mutai around whom the narrative is built Caesar traces the his. While not exactly what I d expected Ed Caesar has done a remarkable job of cohesively stringing together information that he s gathered over much time spent with elite Kenyan primarily there is also some exposure to Ethiopian elites as well runners he has given generously of his time resources skills and goodwill to make these interviews and fact finding missions possible In return he has been provided unprecedented access to international races athletes their coaches and their culture to share an update with readers in layman s terms on the uest to get closer to a mythical marathon finish time Although he interviews and writes about several other elite level distance runners and gives a succinct history and breakdown of the marathon as a distance race the primary focus of this book is Geoffrey Mutai Caesar formed a special bond with the athlete during his research for this book and Mutai was very open with him about his background his culture the secrets of training in Kenya his goals and dreams for the future It s an inspiring and powerful story and I m grateful to the author for having shared this If you ve read a lot of other literature related to Kenyan running for example Running with the Kenyans this may not be news to you since I have not I was very interested to hear about the background of some of these athletes and their lives outside the racing scene Having just finished watching the NYC Marathon last weekend it was pretty fun to read about it s impact on the international racing world as one of the World Marathon Majors in this book Normally international elite runners are simply names on a bib especially those from Kenya since they seem to stay away from the press it was interesting to have a little story to go along with some of the faces Caesar also explores the subject of drug use and recognizes the efforts of shoe companies to work with athletes toward this two hour goal what company wouldn t want to have their sponsored athlete hit this markThe ending is a little abrupt than I prefer but overall I was impressed with his debut effort In addition I must draw attention to Caesar s notes at the back of the book there is some fantastic information that was worth going through but I wish I d done it while reading the book instead of after I d finished I would recommend this to anyone who appreciates or is interested in the sport of distance running runner or not definitely worth the read Entrepreneurial Vernacular plan better and be luckier than anyone who has run before So who will it beIn this spellbinding book journalist Ed Caesar takes us into the world of elite marathoners some of the greatest runners on earth Through the stories of these rich characters like Kenyan Geoffrey Mutai around whom the narrative is built Caesar traces the his. While not exactly what I d expected Ed Caesar has done a remarkable job of cohesively stringing together information that he s gathered over much time spent with elite Kenyan Advanced C Programming by Example primarily there is also some exposure to Ethiopian elites as well runners he has given generously of his time resources skills and goodwill to make these interviews and fact finding missions Poslije svega (After, possible In return he has been Die Herrenschneiderei provided unprecedented access to international races athletes their coaches and their culture to share an update with readers in layman s terms on the uest to get closer to a mythical marathon finish time Although he interviews and writes about several other elite level distance runners and gives a succinct history and breakdown of the marathon as a distance race the Daisy Malone and the Blue Glowing Stone press it was interesting to have a little story to go along with some of the faces Caesar also explores the subject of drug use and recognizes the efforts of shoe companies to work with athletes toward this two hour goal what company wouldn t want to have their sponsored athlete hit this markThe ending is a little abrupt than I Pretend God Is Deaf prefer but overall I was impressed with his debut effort In addition I must draw attention to Caesar s notes at the back of the book there is some fantastic information that was worth going through but I wish I d done it while reading the book instead of after I d finished I would recommend this to anyone who appreciates or is interested in the sport of distance running runner or not definitely worth the read

Read Two Hours

Tory of the marathon as well as the science physiology and psychology involved in running so fast for so long And he shows us why this most democratic of races retains its brutal enthralling appeal and why we are drawn to test ourselves to the limit Two Hours is a book about a beautiful sport few people understand It takes us from big money races in the United States and Europe to remote villages in Kenya It’s about talent heroism and refusing to accept defeat It is a book about running that is about much than running It is a human drama like no othe. A history of the marathon that lobs in a few insights about running Aside from that I suspect the book was hashed out as PR for a shoe manufacturer Caesar seems keen to cast doubt on Chris McDougall s barefoot running theory and it neatly precedes Nikes two hour marathon project


About the Author: Ed Caesar

Ed Caesar is a British author and feature writer who contributes to the New York Times Magazine the Atlantic Outside the Sunday Times Magazine of London and British G Caesar was named Writer of the Year in by the UK's Professional Publishers Association.